Nijo-jo and Kyoto International Manga Museum, Kyoto

Japan was a break from 4.5 years of gruelling hell that was engineering so I deliberately organised my timetable to have Friday’s off. Friday was forever called Adventure Friday where Hazelnut and I would explore somewhere new each week. One of the fondest memories I have was going to Nijo-jo and the Kyoto International Manga Museum.

Nijo-jo

Nijo-jo

Nightingale floorboards lined the floors of Ninomaru Palace at Nijo-jo – the nails on the floorboard were constructed in a way that from a person’s step a creak would sound like a chirping bird. This would alert the presence of anyone and was built as a security measure, rumoured to be against ninjas.

Nijo-jo

Coming at the start of winter the garden was quite dead looking – a bit of a shame :(

Nijo-jo

Nijo-jo

Nijo-jo

Kyoto International Manga Museum

The museum houses 300,000 volumes of manga with shelves covering two floors that you are free to browse, sit and read through. In the Western world it’s either children or Otakus that like comic books and cartoons but this is not the case in Japan. Full grown adults would consume them and you would see Japanese business men all suited up with a manga in hand on the trains.

Kyoto Manga Museum

The exhibition at the museum shows the history and development of manga where it introduces the making of manga – how it is created, drawn and mass produced. For the manga lovers or if you’ve ever been curious why Japan loves manga and anime so much do give this place a visit – I promise you it’s an interesting one and a good break from all the temple hopping.

Kyoto Manga Museum

Have you ever read manga or watched an anime before? My favourites back in the day were One Piece (I have 60+ volumes in Japanese that I can’t read), Naruto and Soul Eater. Oh and I also loved Shojo too but there’s too many to name <3

 

2 comments for “Nijo-jo and Kyoto International Manga Museum, Kyoto

  1. January 21, 2014 at 9:32 am

    Manga covers a wide variety of genres, and reaches audiences in many different and diverse spectrums of ages. Manga is a very important part of the publishing industry of Japan and it motivates many adaptations to different formats: animated series, known as Anime, movies, video games and novels. The above information about museum of manga is such amazing .

    • January 21, 2014 at 11:12 am

      It’s definitely worth a visit – it was so interesting to see that the money from manga trickles down the train and the manga artist themselves don’t make that much. They make a killing from all the other formats you listed before. It blew my mind to hear that because creating manga would require so many hours and hardwork, they must really love what they do to be able to put in the hard yards :)

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